Posts

Social Media – New Masses / Updating to Remain the Same

Do we still live in a mass society? Does that foul spectre of the long and dark 20th century – the masses – extend into the 21st? We would perhaps like to believe that it does not. Or should we say they do not? Part of the anxiety over this strange socio-logical category can already […]

Confronting the screen. Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest at the New Museum

Today, with computers, TVs, and mobile phones, everything is flat and put behind glass – our feelings, histories, longings. We’re all separated from each other, for the human being that we are in contact with is always behind glass… But with art, we can jump out of our loneliness. – Pipilotti Rist Pipilotti Rist: Pixel […]

New media configurations and socio-cultural dynamics in Asia and the Arab world

Today more than ever new media and digital technologies are embedded in everyday life and socio-cultural structures. In fact, the evolving nature of media platforms, the migratory feature of content across various media sites, and the adoption of a participatory culture have tremendously altered the social dynamics not only within the nation-state setting but also […]

Towards a ‘minor data’ manifesto

by Jacek Smolicki and Alberto Frigo Not big and not small data Before moving to a discussion on the concept of minor data we find it important to explain how the term relates, or rather how it differs from existing terms that have emerged in the context of ubiquitous data circulation and accumulation. Big data […]

Forms of binding: On data and not ‘fitting in’

by Anirban Gupta-Nigam Saddleworth Moor On 26 January 2016 The Guardian reported the following: ‘[a] man who died on a remote hillside may have been making a pilgrimage to the scene of plane crash that killed 24 people in 1949, police have said – possibly because he was related to a victim of the disaster’.[1] […]

NECSUS Spring 2017_‘True’ — call for submissions

In contemporary media environments, it is hard to tell what is true and what is not. A considerable amount of the ‘news’ that social media feeds us on a daily basis is either straightforward hoaxes or satirical takes on the deplorable state of current media journalism. With regards to the latter, Stephen Colbert has famously […]

Cows, clicks, ciphers, and satire

by Tom Tyler Farmville, launched in 2009, is a social game developed by Zynga that can be played on Facebook. As its name suggests, the game is a farming simulation which allows players to grow crops, raise animals, and produce a variety of goods. Gameplay involves clicking on land tiles in order to plough, plant, […]

We can haz film fest!: Internet Cat Video Festival goes viral

A festival devoted to internet cat videos set out on a 2014 cross-Canada tour with this promotional tagline – ‘All the cattiness of the film fest. But with cats.’ Just for Cats: Internet Cat Video Festival drew programming from its internationally-acclaimed namesake (also known as #catvidfest), which was launched in 2012 by the Walker Art […]

12th NECS Graduate Workshop in Rome

The 12th NECS Graduate Workshop, From Sensation to Synesthesia: The aesthetic experience and synesthesia in film and new media, takes place from 26-27 February 2015 at Sapienza University of Rome. The workshop aims at elucidating how cinema and new media products can be considered synesthetic machines. The keynote presentation will be delivered by Wanda Strauven […]

Precarious Aesthetics: From Webcams to the Moon

The exhibition Precarious Aesthetics: From Webcams to the Moon, featuring the work of Paula Albuquerque and Daniela de Paulis, opens on 17 January 2015 at Bradwolff Projects in Amsterdam. The exhibition runs until 15 February 2015. On 8 February 2015 NECSUS editor Patricia Pisters will join Albuquerque for an art salon event at 16h. Read […]

Appropriation / Collaboration: Christian Marclay / Harrell Fletcher & Miranda July at the University of Michigan Museum of Art

On the University of Michigan Museum of Art’s (UMMA) website students have been spotted hugging a sculpture, conversing with a lifelike piece of clothing, or holding an inspirational banner encouraging others to love art. These uploads came out of a participatory art project the museum launched to promote and mirror its recent exhibition on new […]

Haunted by participatory culture

Mirko Tobias Schäfer’s Bastard Culture! How User Participation Transforms Cultural Production (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2011) and José van Dijck’s The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013) both approach online services and practices that emerged in the 2000s. The technological and business sides of these phenomena are […]

NECSUS_Autumn 2015_‘Vintage’ — call for submissions

Guest editor: Kim Knowles (Aberystwyth University) Few issues are as pertinent today as the relationship between old and new, past and present, obsolescence and progress. Paradoxically, as the obsession with the new in contemporary society intensifies, so too does our interest in older technologies, styles, and artefacts. Advertising and marketing in particular have tapped into […]

Assembling traces, or the conservation of net art

by Annet Dekker Net art is built and distributed through a complex, intricate, and interrelated system of networks that presents an assemblage of art, technology, politics, and social relations – all merged and related to form a variable entity. In the last decade a discussion on how to conserve net art emerged in museums of […]

Poetics and politics of the trace: Notes on surveillance practices through Harun Farocki’s work

by Miriam De Rosa Found footage and archive images, split-screen or a multiplication of the image on screen, a replacement of the original soundtrack with commentary, a detached voice-over alternating long/silent sequences, an explanatory use of info-graphics and tracking technologies. These elements feature in Harun Farocki’s work on surveillance – work ranging from documentary films […]