Festivals, Books, Conferences, Exhibitions

Evidentiary aesthetics: Landscapes of violence at RIDM 2017

‘Space … is a product of relations-between, relations which are necessarily embedded material practices which have to be carried out.’ – Doreen Massey[1] Founded in 1998 by a group of Québécois documentary filmmakers, the Rencontres internationales du documentaire de Montréal (RIDM) has become one of Canada’s most established documentary film festivals. Since its inception, the […]

Form and feeling: Kinaesthetic Knowing / Artificial Darkness

Formalism, as a term in the criticism of visual art, might be defined thus: as the conviction that forms contain their own syntax which acts on the spectator more or less directly. Further, the formalist maintains that experience of form is aesthetic experience; its effect is something called aesthetic emotion. And its opposite is not […]

(Re)imagining African Independence

In 2015, the former Portuguese colonies of Angola, Mozambique, Sao Tomé and Principe commemorated the 40th anniversary of their independence. In reality, the end of the Portuguese empire in the 1970s was as abrupt as its history had been exceptional in relation to the rest of the 20th century colonies: the length of the Portuguese […]

A brief study of film festivals in Mexico: Consumption and historical evolution 2010-2016

Mexico has experienced several cycles of growth or decline in film production and consumption, and like many other countries its own cinematography has been left out of the North American corpus that dominates the exhibition circuits. The mastery of American cinematography, which largely responds to canons originating with the Hollywood industry, imposes guidelines for aesthetic […]

The Dutch film festival landscape: A walk-through

Introduction Festivals are nowadays a cultural, social, and economic force to be reckoned with. This study will offer an overview of the Dutch festival landscape, which has been lacking. There are commercial initiatives that target only a portion of the festival sector, and there are specific branch organisations or cultural funds that only cover the […]

Codes of conflux: Collaborations between human and computer in MoMA’s Thinking Machines

There is an eerie familiarity visible in the photographs of office workers’ faces installed in the middle of Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959-1989, an exhibition that was presented at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City this past winter. It is a mix of strange affects we might […]

Nothing Stable under Heaven at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

At its best, it is carefully-constructed chaos. At its worst, it is equally chaotic but less carefully constructed. Nothing Stable under Heaven (https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/nothing-stable-under-heaven/) is an exhibition that bombards you from all angles as it forces you to juggle different and sometimes jumbled social issues and themes. Running at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art […]

Racial phantasmagoria: The demonisation of the other in Richard Mosse’s ‘Incoming’

Richard Mosse’s Incoming (2014-17) is a large-scale video installation mapping the flow of refugees displaced by the Syrian Civil War, shown last spring at the National Gallery of Victoria’s Triennial in Melbourne, Australia. The National Gallery is one of the largest museums in the country and its inaugural Triennial seeks to survey the international world […]

TV Socialism / Broadcasting Modernity

The study of television is often viewed as a crucial window into a given society’s popular culture. Dominant codes of meaning contained within the programming, and the ways in which various cultural groups decode those meanings – even the very broadcast technology itself – can reveal much about a society’s values, politics, and cultural traditions. […]

20 Years of Ícaro spreading its wings: Ícaro International Film Festival

The global imaginary of Central America, encompassing Guatemala, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama,[1] often relates to the subcontinent’s turbulent history and strategic geopolitical positioning. From succumbing to European imperial forces in the 15th century to the end of the Cold War and its aftermath, the southernmost isthmus of North America that connects […]

We need to talk about Indian Panorama: A report from the International Film Festival of India 2017

The enduring image from the 48th edition of the International Film Festival of India (IFFI), held from 20 to 28 November 2017, is of the actor Kannan Nayar angry, and waiting impatiently, outside the Inox multiplex complex in Panjim, Goa. He could be seen agitatedly talking to a group of people, to the media, and […]

Mobile cinema as an archive in motion: A Wall is a Screen and urban memories

Hundreds of people following a person with a megaphone through deserted city centres at night. A political demonstration? A secret society? No, this is A Wall is a Screen (AWIAS),[1] a mobile outdoor cinema, cinematic city walk, and pop-up film festival all in one, which – as its name suggests – uses walls of buildings […]

We have never been (post)modern: Photography’s late encounters with film

The discussions on the relationship between photography and film have for a long time been centred on stillness and duration. The two oldest of the so-called new media seemed settled in binary oppositions, as it was either the photograph’s death portrait or the motion picture’s vital progression. Ice or fire, as Peter Wollen aptly proclaimed.[1] […]

Engaging new audiences with old and new experimental film: The E*Cinema Academy film series at EYE Filmmuseum

In 2012 EYE, the former Nederlands Filmmuseum, moved to its new building, gaining two additional theatres and an ex­­­­­hibition venue. This allowed increasing the frequency of exhibitions, their variety, and the flow of visitors, in line with the expectations of current cultural and fund polices. In a couple of years, EYE shifted from mainly a […]

Sergei Eisenstein: The Anthropology of Rhythm, a conversation with curators Marie Rebecchi and Elena Vogman

The exhibition Sergei Eisenstein: The Anthropology of Rhythm (Nomas Foundation, Rome, 20 September 2017 – 19 January 2018) explores the intersecting artistic, anthropological, and political dimensions of the unfinished film projects of Sergei Eisenstein: Que viva Mexico! (1931-1932), Bezhin Meadow (1935-1937), and Fergana Canal (1939). Curated by art and film historians Marie Rebecchi (Paris) and […]