Book Review Submissions

The book review section in NECSUS publishes critical writing on recent publications that fall within the broad scope of media studies. Reviewers are invited to write essays of 2,000-3,000 words that focus on one or more recent publications. Omnibus reviews should address how the chosen titles relate to each other. We also welcome reviews of non-English language publications. We do not allow reviews in which the author is involved in the book, either as an editor, contributor, or translator.

It is important that authors take a critical stance on their chosen titles, providing a thoughtful account of the texts and their position alongside other media studies scholarship rather than a general summary. Authors should not be connected to the writers of the books they are reviewing in either personal or professional terms. Reviews may be motivated by current trends in film and media studies but can also tackle issues that remain overlooked within the disciplines. The purpose of the book review section is to inform NECSUS readers about new scholarship in media studies and to support critical engagement with published work.

Follow general style guidelines as explicated here.

Additional book review guidelines:

  • Focus on two or more recent publications that are related thematically (should be published within the last two years)
  • Position the publication(s) within existing scholarship
  • Take a critical stance towards the work (e.g., choose one or more issues/themes to structure the review)
  • On the first mention of each book, please include the full title in italics and the bibliographic information in parentheses
  • Only for book reviews, use in-text references in the following manner: (p. 55) or (pp. 55-65)
  • Include your name and affiliation at the end of the review (no short bios needed)

If you are interested in writing a book review please send inquiries to the section editors Lavinia Brydon and Alena Strohmaier using our contact form.


Festival Review Submissions

The NECSUS film festival review section publishes critical writing on film festivals. It offers a platform for writing that falls between the fast and prolific genre of individual festival reports and the slow and rigorous labor of film festival research. Rather than merely reviewing the latest festival edition, contributors are asked to take a critical distance and reflect upon one or more thematic issues that are relevant to the professional field and/or for media studies. Reviews can be motivated by current affairs but should also tackle issues that tend to remain hidden in the midst of festival buzz. Contributors should not be employed by the festival they are reviewing.

Follow general style guidelines as explicated here.

Additional festival review guidelines:

  • Maximum 2,500 words
  • Focus on up to 3 film festivals
  • Include short introductions of the festivals discussed
  • Choose one or more issues/themes to structure your critical review
  • Provide URLs of the mentioned festivals
  • Include your name and affiliation at the end of the review (no short bios needed)

If you are interested in writing a festival review please contact the section editors Marijke de Valck (marijke@filmfestivalresearch.org) and Skadi Loist (skadi@filmfestivalresearch.org).


Exhibition Review Submissions

The exhibition review section in NECSUS publishes critical writing on cinema, visual, and media arts exhibitions. It aims to offer a platform for writing that ranges from academic to critical approaches, encompassing the contributions of scholars, curators, artists, and practitioners. This two-fold approach intends to open up a discussion space between essayistic and artistic perspectives.

The section will feature different formats:

  • Standard exhibition review (maximum 2,000 words)
  • Artist/curator interview detailing specific insight by an artist/curator about the exhibition he/she contributed to (maximum 4,000 words)
  • ‘Exhibition tour with’ – visiting the exhibition with a person of specific relevance for its realisation, or somebody with important insights in the concepts and themes that are key to the works at hand (maximum 3,000 words)

Guidelines for reviewers:

  • Include short introductions of the institution hosting the exhibition as well as the context
  • Choose one or more issues/themes to structure your critical review
  • Provide a URL for the mentioned exhibition
  • When particularly coherent within the text, give up to three suggestions for further reading, of which at least one is an academic source
  • Include a short biography of the artist (maximum 150 words)

If you are interested in writing an exhibition review please send inquiries to section editors Miriam de Rosa and Leo Goldsmith using our contact form.